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From the President: Woodstock addresses Chase CEO at Shareholder Meeting in NYC

Written by Dory Rand on May 20, 2010 - 12:00am

Since I do not own stock in Chase, I used a shareholder proxy kindly provided by colleague Adam Rust of the Community Reinvestment Association of North Carolina (CRA-NC) to gain entry (through tight security) to the shareholder meeting. When I got my turn at the microphone, I explained that, as a customer of Chase and its predecessor banks in Chicago for nearly 28 years, I want to be proud of the bank where I do business.

TARP-Supported Banks Reduced Lending in Chicago, New Data Show

The report, Paying More for the American Dream IV, examines the mortgage lending patterns of banks, including the nation’s four largest financial institutions, in seven metropolitan areas in the United States: Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, New York City, and Rochester, NY.

Register now for “Beyond Foreclosures: The Impact of the Financial Crisis on the Wealth Gap and Economic Opportunity”

“Beyond Foreclosures:  The Impact of the Financial Crisis on the Wealth Gap and Economic Opportunity” will explore how the economic and foreclosure crisis has changed the landscape of access to financial services, and in particular, how it has affected credit scores and bankruptcy rates in communities of color.

“Beyond Foreclosures:  The Impact of the Financial Crisis on the Wealth Gap and Economic Opportunity”

The Community Lending Fact Book: Measuring the recovery, one loan at a time

For 25 years, Chicago region community organizations, lenders, banking regulators, and the media have relied on Woodstock’s analysis of local lending patterns to highlight community investment success stories, and show how some communities have been passed over.

Overdraft fees, other products, increase economic insecurity in retirement

 
Automatic enrollment in overdraft programs means that many older persons are being charged high fees for products that do not want or need.  In fact, 75 percent of older persons would prefer to have a transaction declined than incur overdraft fees. Persons aged 55 and over pay $4.5 billion in overdraft fees each year. Over $513 million of these overdraft fees are levied on recipients of Social Security benefits.

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