Protect students from schools with high debt and little benefit

Some career education programs promise students a bright future, but many graduates of such schools find that they don’t have the right credentials for their careers—and a shockingly high percentage never graduate at all.

Often students leave these schools with high debt loads, even though their employment prospects may be no better than before. This means they may not be able to repay their student loans, save for emergencies, buy a house, or improve their economic opportunities.

The Department of Education is working on a rule to protect students from schools that empty students’ wallets without preparing them for the future. The rule limits the amount of federal aid, including loans, that career education schools receive if they don’t prepare students for gainful employment. Unfortunately, the current draft of the rule isn’t strong enough to limit the damage done by poorly performing for-profit career education colleges.

We need your help. Please take 2 minutes to urge the Department of Education to strengthen the rule by sending in this comment letter that asks the Department to provide relief for students in failing schools, limit enrollment in poorly performing schools until the schools improve, close loopholes, and protect low-cost programs. You can personalize the letter with stories of your experience or the experiences of people you serve. Comments are due by Tuesday, May 27, so take action now!