What we’re reading: Urban and personal mysteries, payday lending and Indian tribes, in search of beef, and more

This week, our staff wonders about disappearing Chicago neighborhoods and vanishing identities, ponders the solution to suburban Sunbelt poverty, finds out that some payday lenders are partnering with Indian tribes to circumvent regulations, and looks for truly delectable Japanese beef in America.

An urban planning whodunit: the Chicago neighborhood that vanished into thin air (WBEZ)—Lee Bey cracks the mystery of a neighborhood that appeared—and then disappeared—within three decades.—Sarah Duda, Senior Research and Project Associate

Et in Arcadia ego (The Economist)– Article investigating the dramatic increases in poverty in suburban Sunbelt cities and the difficulty those cities are having responding to the problem.—Geoff Smith, Senior Vice President

Man on a mission: In search of true wagyu (Chicago Tribune)—I never had real Kobe beef while studying in Japan (although I did try poisonous blowfish), but I had some excellent Wagyu beef recently in a five-part tasting menu at Graham Elliott restaurant in Chicago.—Dory Rand, President

The answer to the riddle is me (This American Life)—Okay, so this is “What I’m Listening To,” not “What I’m Reading.” A gripping account of a man who woke up in India one day with no memory, no passport, and no conception of who he was—and how he got it all back.—Katie Buitrago, Policy and Communications Associate

Payday Lenders Join With Indian Tribes (Wall Street Journal; subscription only)—A fascinating investigation of some payday lenders who use Indian tribes’ sovereignty to circumvent interest rate caps and other consumer protections, even in states that have banned payday lending.—Tom Feltner, Vice President

 

 

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